GOM Correlate - Scan-Xpress
17068
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GOM Correlate

GOM Correlate – Digital Image Correlation

Software for 3D Testing Data


GOM Correlate is a digital image correlation (DIC) and evaluation software for materials research and component testing. Digital image correlation is an optical non-contact method to obtain 3D co-ordinates in space, allowing the evaluation of surfaces, motion and deformation. Using a stochastic pattern or point markers, images areas can be described with sub-pixel accuracy. The software can then compute the areas for positional changes, allowing a wide application of material analysis, such as displacements & strain. Therefore, DIC enables investigation in the material behaviour of any component.

 

Highlighted Features


Digital Image Correlation

 

Digital image correlation (DIC) is an optical, non-contact method to measure 3D coordinates for the evaluation of motion and deformation in 3D space and for the determination of surface strain. Stochastic patterns and/or reference point markers are used to measure 3D coordinates with subpixel accuracy.

Full-Field and Point-Based Evaluation

 

A stochastic contrast pattern is applied to the specimen for full-field measuring results, such as strain distributions. For point-based measurements, reference point markers are used. The reference point markers on the specimen are detected automatically by the software and the measured 3D coordinates are displayed. There is the possibility to use the full-field and point-based evaluation method together within one measurement.

Strain, 3D Displacement and 3D Deformation

 

Strain, strain rates, 3D displacements, 3D deformations, velocities and accelerations can be computed from the 3D coordinates measured over the entire surface and at specific points. The software provides strain values, such as major strain and minor strain or strain in X-direction and Y-direction. Point groups, so-called components, can be defined from the individual measuring points. The software can identify the point groups over the entire time course of the test. This enables the accurate computation of displacements, velocities and accelerations in three dimensions.